MANAGING ASTHMA

. Posted in ASTHMA

Asthma is one of the most serious, if not life-threatening, symptoms of chronic airway-digestive inflammatory disease (CAID). There are millions of people who are affected by asthma, ranging from the very young to the very old, crossing ethnic barriers and socioeconomic groups. In the United States, asthma is the number one killer of children.

The symptoms of asthma directly affect our ability to breathe, which we often take for granted. If you have ever experienced an asthma attack or have witnessed a child or a friend suffering from asthma, then you know full well how scary it can be.

An asthma attack can be caused by something as benign as cold air or exertion. Allergies and drugs (such as aspirin or nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs like Advil or Motrin) have been linked to asthma, as has stress. For people with asthma, the main goal of therapy is the prevention of chronic asthma symptoms so they can maintain a good quality of life without disruption - in school or work - and without frequent emergency room visits or hospitalizations.

Asthma is defined as a reversible constriction of the airways. In most instances, this causes wheezing. However, you can have asthma without wheezing, and there are other disorders that cause wheezing unrelated to asthma.

Sinus Tips:
There are no surgical treatments that can control asthma symptoms, but for patients who suffer from both sinus disease that requires surgery and asthma, I have found that these pat
Asthma related to allergies and CAID can be controlled, and often prevented, through avoidance and education. If you can recognize your triggers, as well as your trigger symptoms,
Children usually experience complete remission from asthma more frequently than adults do. Between 30 and 70 percent of children who develop asthma either improve or are totally as
Women with asthma used to be discouraged from becoming pregnant, but advances in medication have made pregnancy extremely possible. Yet like all other aspects of pregnancy, it can
Steroids in an oral or intravenous form are used to treat a range of asthma attacks. Their role is to reduce the inflammation of the bronchial tube’s lining, thus reducing the ac
Quick-relief medications relax the muscles around the bronchial tubes so that air can flow freely through them. As noted earlier, these medications are called bronchodilators or be
This initial hit of inflammation would probably lead you to believe that you had come down with a simple cold.